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Meet Our 2024 Plenary Presenters

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Joe Packowski

Indiana University

Pedagogy of Empowerment: 5 Principles To Accelerate Mutually Beneficial Learning

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Sheri Stover

Wright State University

The Science of How Students Learn

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Todd Zakrajsek

University of North Carolina Chapel Hill

Using Generative AI to Engage Students and Promote Deep Learning

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Joe Packowski

Indiana University

Pedagogy of Empowerment: 5 Principles To Accelerate Mutually Beneficial Learning

About the presenter...

Joe currently teaches in the Communications and Professional Development Area at the Kelley School of Business at Indiana University – Bloomington. After 25 years in industry as a sales professional and recruiter, Joe transitioned to academia in the fall of 2021. His teaching philosophy is strongly rooted in experiential learning, evidence-based pedagogical principles, and empowering his students to think differently. Through his application of an active learning grant and an innovative grading strategy (Specifications Grading), Joe respectfully challenges his students to think holistically, to embrace diversity of thought and perspectives, and to foster a mutually beneficial partnership inside and outside of the classroom where students truly feel inspired to prioritize their learning over grades. Joe is passionate about incorporating his core personal values of family, fun, and integrity into his classroom to offer an inclusive and rewarding experience to best prepare his students for their eventual transition to industry as professionals and philanthropic brand ambassadors. Joe currently lives in Bloomington, Indiana with his wife and 3 children and is in the process of applying for his doctorate in Instructional Systems Technology at the School of Education (Indiana University – Bloomington). In his spare time, Joe enjoys playing his acoustic guitar, aspires to a whole-foods/plant-based lifestyle, and incorporates the Japanese philosophy of Kaizen into his everyday life.

Pedagogy of Empowerment:
5 Principles To Accelerate Mutually Beneficial Learning

Key Statement:  

From course map designs and annual reviews to scholarly research and student feedback systems, proactive infrastructure assessments can help stimulate learning and inclusive, purposeful fulfillment.

Full circle empowerment. Infrastructure associated with planning for a course may include Universal Design for Learning, Course Map Design, or Transparency in Teaching and Learning. While these systems are viable considerations to best support our students, what other processes are available to help stimulate creativity, foster mutually beneficial partnerships, and empower personal development – and not just for our students, but for us as staff, administrators, or educators?


Core goals that many of us strive for can include helping our students apply their classroom experiences aligned to student learning outcomes and workplace preparedness. But what proactive development goals are available to us aligned to our own pedagogical principles, teaching theories, and career aspirations? In our conversation, we’ll discuss proactive lead measures that are inspirational opportunities (from scholarly research, evidence-based insights, industry best practices, and risk mitigation tips) to help kindle personal growth strategies that are inclusive pathways to purposeful fulfillment.

Session Outcomes:

1. Understand / Self-Awareness: Participate and be able to interpret and paraphrase the importance of a true gap analysis (current to desired state) aligned to strengths-based or deficit-based personal goals.


2. Analyze / Research & Development: Isolate and be able to relate and articulate 2 of the 5 Principles To Accelerate Mutually Beneficial Learning that align with one’s own personal career aspirations.


3. Create / Go To Market: Develop and write 2 Individual Development Plans (IDP’s) for implementation consideration during one’s next annual review with their supervisor/department chair inspired by our authenticity and insatiable quest for personal development through differentiation – strongly rooted in the success of our students.

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Sheri Stover

Wright State University

The Science of How Students Learn

About the presenter...

Sheri Stover, PhD., is a Professor and Program Director for the Instructional Design and Learning Technologies program at Wright State University. She is a Center for Faculty Excellence Affiliate and provides faculty Quality Matters (QM) training. She has several QM certifications, including APPQMR Facilitation and Peer Review. She has received many awards, including the 2021-22 Distinguished Professor of Teaching, 2020 CEHS Outstanding Faculty, 2019 CEHS Excellence in Professional Service, 2017 Excellence in Teaching, and 2014 CEHS Excellence in Scholarship. Her areas of research include Scholarship of Teaching and Learning with a focus on Instructional Design and Learning Technologies.

The Science of How Students Learn

Key Statement: 

Research shows that students frequently use ineffective learning strategies. Participants will learn how to design classes where students use effective learning to enhance long-term memory.

Many students use ineffective study habits, such as rereading their textbooks, which has limited learning benefits (Hartwig & Dunlosky, 2011). Students are poor judges of their knowledge levels because rereading their textbooks causes a fluency illusion, making the content seem familiar (Carey, 2014). Most students also report cramming for tests which has been shown to have short-term benefits, but is ineffective for long-term retention (Kornel, 2009). Dunlosky et al. (2013) found four strategies that have made a significant improvement in students' learning: (1) retrieval practice, (2) robust and immediate feedback, (3) spaced practice, and (4) interleaving or mixing studying. This presentation will share the current research on how students learn. It will also provide instructors with strategies to design their classes, requiring students to adopt more effective study habits.

Session Outcomes:

1. Learn some of the ineffective studying strategies currently used by students.


2. Learn four strategies to design their classes to significantly improve students’ learning.


3. Learn examples of how to implement retrieval practice, robust feedback, spaced practice, and interleaving.

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Using Generative AI to Engage Students and Promote Deep Learning

Todd Zakrajsek

University of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill

Todd D. Zakrajsek PhD, is an Associate Research Professor in the School of Medicine at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He develops resources for faculty on teaching/learning, leadership, and publishing. Prior to joining the SOM he was a tenured associate professor of psychology and built faculty development efforts at three universities. Todd has served on many educationally related boards and work groups during his four decades of teaching and faculty development. He has also consulted with organizations such as The American Council on Education (ACE), Lenovo Computer, Microsoft, and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. For the past 20 years, Todd has directed Lilly Conferences on evidence-based teaching and learning and is the editor of The Scholarly Teacher, an online resource for faculty in higher education. Todd’s recent books include Classroom Assessment Techniques 3rd ed. (due out July, 2024, with Tom Angelo), Teaching at Its Best, 5th ed. (2023, with Linda Nilson); The New Science of Learning, 3rd ed, (2022); Teaching for Learning, 2nd ed. (2021, with Claire Major and Michael Harris); Advancing Online Teaching (2021, with Kevin Kelly); and Dynamic Lecturing (2017, with Christine Harrington). Todd has given more than 300 campus workshops, conference presentations, and keynote addresses in 49 states, 12 countries, and 4 continents.

Follow and connect with Todd on Twitter (@toddzakrajsek), Instagram, and LinkedIn.

About the presenter...

Using Generative AI to Engage Students and
Promote Deep Learning

Key Statement:

This plenary addresses actionable strategies for leveraging GenAI to promote deep learning and also a better understand as to when AI may impede students’ educational journey.

GenAI presents significant challenges and also significant educational opportunities. This session will focus on ways in which GenAI can bolster and deepen the educational experience. GenAI is not just another tool; it’s a transformative opportunity to tailor learning experiences to each student's unique needs, opening new avenues to learning like never before. This plenary address will delve into actionable strategies for leveraging GenAI to enhance learning, ensuring students see possible educational benefits and also better understand when it may impede their educational journey. Join me in reshaping the narrative, focusing on GenAI as a catalyst for deep learning and even more engaged teaching.

Session Outcomes:

1. Explain 3 core aspects of learning and how AI can be used to address those core areas.


2. Explain in which situations and why AI might impede critical thinking.


3. Integrate into a course at least one new AI assignment designed to deepen student learning.

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